Subscriber Login

Project Update

Moses–Adirondack Smart Path Reliability Project, US [free access]

December 17, 2020

Developer: New York Power Authority (NYPA)

 

Project details and status: The proposed project aims to strengthen the New York state electric power grid and enable more renewable energy (RE) from upstate New York and Canada to be connected to the state’s power system.

 

The USD483.8 million project will use existing right-of-way (RoW) to rebuild 230 kV, 86 miles (138 km) of transmission lines, extending from NYPA's Robert Moses Power Dam switchyard in Massena to the Adirondack substation in Croghan, in two phases. The first phase includes rebuilding a 78-mile (126-km) line that was constructed originally by the federal government in 1942 and acquired by the Power Authority in 1950. The second phase would involve replacing the remaining 8-mile (12-km) transmission lines with two single-circuits, and upgrading the Moses switchyard and the Adirondack substation to 345 kV.

 

In April 2018, NYPA filed an application with the New York Public Service Commission (PSC) seeking authority to rebuild and operate its existing 230 kV Moses–Adirondack 1 and 2 transmission lines and other associated network, under the project.

 

In November 2019, the New York PSC granted the certificate of environmental compatibility and public need (CECPN) to the project.

 

In December 2019, The Board of Directors of New York Power Authority (NYPA) approved an investment of USD484 million for the project.

 

In February 2020, The New York state government approved USD341 million funding for the project, under which the state government also approved the USD294 million construction contract of the project as a part of its funding, for project construction. The project construction contract was awarded to US-based Michels Corporation. The contract approval aims to support the construction of the new lines primarily on existing RoW, in order to minimise the impacts on the environment and adjacent landowners.

 

In November 2020, NYPA completed work on the first 21-mile (34-km) section of the first phase of the project. The rebuilt lines will be capable of transmitting up to 345 kV, but they will be operated in the near term at the 230 kV level. They will connect RE to the state-wide power system, including low-cost hydropower from NYPA's St. Lawrence–Franklin D. Roosevelt Power Project, as well as power from other newly constructed RE sources.

 

The entire project is scheduled to be completed by 2023.